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NEWS: 

ENVST Student Brianna Milot is Published in the Salt Lake Tribune 

"Brianna Milot began studying weed pulls in a research project overseen by the U.’s Environmental and Sustainability Studies Program. She staked out two research plots in Red Butte Canyon, where she documented an abundance of the plant in March 2017 and again this year. She concluded that pulling out the plants reduces the prevalence of myrtle spurge, but only if an area is treated in following years."

- Salt Lake Tribune

Congratulations Bri! 

Read more about Bri's hard work and her reserach on Mrytle Spurge. 


ENVST Graduate Kiman Kaur|Beehive 5 Under 25 Awardee

"USEE is pleased to announce the 2018 Awardees of the first annual Beehive 5 Under 25 recognition program! Modeled after NAAEE's 30 Under 30, the Utah Beehive 5 Under 25  program recgonizes individuals, 25 years old or younger, who are game changers in their communities. These young people are taking on leadership positions to make a difference for the planet. They are engaging their communities, building relationships, and using the power of education to create change.

These youth are also recognizing the importance of diversity, inclusion, and equity and applying those principles to their work. "

           - Utah Society for Environmental Education 

Congratulations Kiman! 

Learn more about Kiman's experiences and the difference she is making to our community. 

 

 

 


Edible Campus Gardens' 2017 Season Highlights

Winterizing Beds on KUED's Modern Gardener

Garlic Planting on KUED's Modern Gardener

Produce Pickups in @theU

Thank you to all the volunteers who helped the garden grow this season! They are still having volunteer sessions and workshops throughout the winter. If you're interested in volunteering, sign up here.


ENVST former student Genie Bey selected as Switzer Environmental Fellow

Twenty Environmental scholars were chosen as 2017 recipients of the Switzer Environmental Fellowship...


ENVST Student Logan Hastings Wins CSBS Internship of the Year:

Save Our Canyons

Winning Perks:

Despite being a subpar social media plug, I think this picture perfectly encompasses the perks of my internship at Save Our Canyons. In addition to the materialistic perks of some backpacks, water bottles, an endless supply of Chums, and a multitude of pro deals, I have gained significant professional connections, personal experiences, and an unforgettable exposure to the natural beauty of the Wasatch.

Those stunning mountains in the background of the picture, also known as the Wasatch Range, are what Save Our Canyons diligently protects. From land use issues with ski resorts to watershed protection with Salt Lake County, this organization works with many groups and individuals to ensure the protection and enjoyment of the Wasatch. Working with such an amazing staff has definitely been a perk, not to mention we’ll be going rafting together this summer. As a first year Environmental Studies student, the connections I have made, not only with the staff, but with local legislators and public figures, have created a foundation for my professional career in Salt Lake City one year after being here.

This internship also had some major perks for my personal life. I have met mentors and friends that I hope to keep with me for the rest of my life. Also, whenever I wanted to escape campus, I would be “take a field day” of hiking, climbing, skiing in the Wasatch to capture some social media content and remind me why this landscape must be protected. Similarly, this internship extended my first year experience well beyond campus. In these mountains, I have found both adrenaline and refuge, which have developed a profound love for Wasatch that I will undoubtedly keep for the rest of my life.


Listening for Solutions

During the course of two transatlantic trips to India, and a semester of intercultural collaboration, University of Utah students discovered that before you can solve, you have to listen.

From December 2015 through June 2016, history professor Benjamin Cohen and Stephen Goldsmith, associate professor (lecturer) in the Department of City & Metropolitan Planningbuilt an interdisciplinary cohort of six University of Utah and nine Indian student researchers. Tasked by the United States Consulate General in Hyderabad to create ‘market-ready solutions for sustainable urbanization,’ the team chose to target water. Hyderabad, the capital of the Indian state Telangana, was once known as the city of lakes. Today, Hyderabad’s residents face water insecurity due, in part, to problematic urban development. Cohen and Goldsmith used the grant as a singular opportunity for U students to connect sustainability, culture and applied research toward addressing one of Hyderabad’swicked problems For the whole article, click here

 

Last Updated: 9/26/18